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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Studies in the Orations of Libanius found in the catalog.

Studies in the Orations of Libanius

G. Middleton

Studies in the Orations of Libanius

by G. Middleton

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Published by The University Press in Aberdeen .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Libanius.

  • Edition Notes

    Cover-title.

    StatementBy G. Middleton.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2p.ts. in 1 v ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21442729M

      Not long ago Cribiore has published a monograph that deals with the literary dimension of Libanius’ orations and letters, as well as his attitude towards religion, and the reader of her monograph will not be surprised to find in the present volume, in particular in the introductions to the texts, much material reused from her previous book. 3. Thanks to recent monographs and translations, among them Raffaella Cribiore's The School of Libanius in Late Antique Antioch (), Libanius's work—including 64 orations and 1, letters—is becoming more accessible. The survival of so many texts by a pagan author is an invaluable resource for a period otherwise dominated by Christian writers.

    Libanius (Greek: Λιβάνιος, Libanios; c. – or ) was a Greek teacher of rhetoric of the Sophist school. During the rise of Christian hegemony in /5(4). The orations on Julian, to whose memory he remained devoted all his life, were composed between and , and present Libanius with a congenial subject, revealing him at the height of his powers and available in the Loeb Classical Library is a two-volume edition of Libanius's Autobiography and Selected Letters.

    In this book, Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius's vast literary output-including 64 orations, 1, letters, and exercises for his students-to offer the fullest intellectual portrait yet of this remarkable figure whom John Chrystostom called "the sophist of the city.". In this book Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius’s vast literary output—including 64 orations, 1, letters, and exercises for his students—to offer the fullest intellectual portrait yet of this remarkable figure whom John Chrystostom called "the sophist of the city.".


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Studies in the Orations of Libanius by G. Middleton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Life. Libanius was born into a once-influential, deeply cultured family of Antioch that had recently come into diminished circumstances. At fourteen years old he began his study of rhetoric, for which he withdrew from public life and devoted himself to liar with Latin literature, he deplored its influence.

He studied in Athens under Diophantus the Arab and began his career in. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Middleton, G. Studies in the Orations of Libanius. Aberdeen, University Press, (OCoLC)   Libanius is a key figure for anybody studying late antiquity, but also ancient rhetoric, epistolography and biography.

This book is the first comprehensive study of the author. Written by the foremost experts in the field, it unlocks the author's difficult oeuvre, sets it 5/5(1). Between City and School: Selected Orations of Libanius, Paperback by Cribiore, Raffaella (TRN), ISBNISBNBrand New, Free shipping in the US This book provides an English translation of 12 orations (mostly unknown) of the sophist Libanius who had an important school of rhetoric in Antioch (Syria) and was one of the most influential figures in the fourth century.

This volume, which is the first comprehensive study of Libanius, offers a critical introduction to the man, his texts, their context and reception. Clear presentations of the orations, progymnasmata, declamations and letters unlock the corpus, and a survey of all available translations is provided.

In this book, Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius’s vast literary output—including 64 orations, 1, letters, and exercises for his students—to offer the fullest intellectual portrait yet of this remarkable figure whom John Chrystostom called “the sophist of the city.".

Libanius - edited by Lieve Van Hoof September Introduction. This chapter discusses Libanius’ terms used in Latin and in modern languages to denote this part of Libanius’ output – oratio, oration, discours, Rede, orazione, discorso – risk to cause confusion as they are far too restrictive compared to the Greek term, logos, which covers a much larger variety of texts.

Liverpool University Press is the UK's Studies in the Orations of Libanius book oldest university press, with a distinguished history of publishing exceptional research since This book is a collection of twelve important but little-read orations of the fourth-century sophist Libanius, providing an English translation for each with a thorough introduction and copious notes.

here. Libanius’ hypotheses are not simply summaries of Demosthenes’ speeches. Summary does play a major role in the hypotheses to the longer speeches, but Libanius’ main task was to read each speech and reconstruct the history of events leading up to it.

e hypotheses do not pretend to replace the experience of reading the speeches. Libanius (– CE) was one of the last great publicists and teachers of Greek story, as presented in his Autobiography and the Life by Eunapius, is supplemented by information from a correspondence of over items and 64 extant orations.

Libanius, (born adAntioch, Syria—died ), Greek Sophist and rhetorician whose orations and letters are a major source of information on the political, social, and economic life of Antioch and of the eastern part of the Roman Empire in the 4th century.

After beginning his teaching career in Constantinople and Nicomedia, Libanius went to Antioch (), where his school soon became famous. Finally, a large group of orations shed light on the school and school life, as, more importantly, do Libanius’s works.

Himerius, for example, speaks at the recommencement of studies and at the. Oration XLV, XXXIII Introduction. The orations On the Prisoners and Against Tisamenus are an example of Libanius’ practice of composing orations as “doublets.” They are supplementary to each other, both ostensibly destined for the emperor’s consideration and drawing his attention to the same situation from two different starting points.

Libanius of Antioch was a rhetorician of rare skill and eloquence. So renowned was he in the fourth century that his school of rhetoric in Roman Syria became among the most prestigious in the Eastern Empire.

In this book, Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius’s vast literary output—including 64 orations, 1, letters, and exercises for his.

Download PDF/ePub Libanius the Sophist: Rhetoric, Reality, and Religion in the Fourth Century (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology Book 63) (English Edition) ~ TOP Books This site not only provides free textbooks, but also fiction, comics and Libanius the Sophist: Rhetoric, Reality, and Religion in the Fourth Century (Cornell Studies in Classical Philology Book 63) (English Edition).

The orations on Julian, to whose memory he remained devoted all his life, were composed between andand present Libanius with a congenial subject, revealing him at the height of his powers and influence.

Also available in the Loeb Classical Library is a two-volume edition of Libanius’s Autobiography and Selected Letters. In this book Raffaella Cribiore draws on her unique knowledge of the entire body of Libanius’s vast literary output―including 64 orations, 1, letters, and exercises for his students―to offer the fullest intellectual portrait yet of this remarkable figure whom John Chrystostom called "the sophist of the city."Author: Raffaella Cribiore.

The book follows on C.’s prizewinning Gymnastics of the Mind (Princeton, ) and the relationship between the two is explicit: “Though Egypt provides the tangible remains of ancient rhetorical education, Syria (through Libanius’s school works, orations, and letters) contributes a sort of commentary to those teaching and learning.

Libanius ( CE) was one of the last great publicists and teachers of Greek paganism. His story, as presented in his Autobiography and the Life by Eunapius, is supplemented by information from a correspondence of over items and 64 extant orations.

A native of Antioch, he began his teaching career in Constantinople inbut soon had to retire to Nicomedeia, where he became. Libanius - edited by Lieve Van Hoof September Introduction.

At the end of the first part of his Autobiography (Oration 1), published as a composition in its own right inLibanius included a grand oratorical speech of Fortune, who spoke ‘as if in a play’. Libanius’ tutelary deity, Tychē, provided a convenient template that served to give unity to the whole of Oration 1 (§§1.

This book is a study of the fourth-century sophist Libanius, a major intellectual figure who ran one of the most prestigious schools of rhetoric in the later Roman Empire.

He was a tenacious adherent of pagan religion and a friend of the emperor Julian, but also taught leaders of the early.Libanius lived in Antioch (Syria) where he was a teacher of rhetoric: His school was the most important in the East and students flocked there from many countries.

Some of the orations in this collection, like his correspondence, illuminate his relations with his students as well as his methods of teaching rhetoric, a discipline for which he.Buy Libanius: A Critical Introduction Critical by Van Hoof, Lieve (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

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